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Meeting on May 15th!

May 15th, 2017 – Our 98th meeting!!  We continue our seventh year. 

The next meeting of the Nashville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Monday, May 15th, 2017, in the visitor’s center of Ft. Negley Park, a unit of Metro Parks, Nashville, TN.  This is located off I-65 just south of downtown between 4th Avenue South and 8th Avenue South on Edgehill Avenue/Chestnut Avenue.  Take Exit 81, Wedgewood Avenue, off I-65 and follow the signs to the Science Museum.

The meeting begins at 7:00 PM and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

Our Speaker and Topic  – “Forrest’s Railroad Raid of 1864”

Throughout the summer of 1864 Confederate General Joe Johnston had been begging Richmond to send Nathan Bedford Forrest to break Sherman’s supply lines during the Atlanta campaign.  Fully aware of Forrest’s prowess as a raider, Union commander Gen. William T. Sherman had cannily arranged raids into Mississippi that kept Forrest tied down in the Magnolia State.  These culminated on the battles at Brice’s Crossroads and Tupelo/Harrisburg.  In mid July, Johnston got fired, his replacement John Bell Hood was unable to hold Atlanta, and finally, after Atlanta surrendered on September 2nd, Forrest was ordered to leave Mississippi and go after Sherman’s railroads in Middle Tennessee and northern Alabama.  This is the story of that raid—highly successful at the tactical level but its subtitle could be “Two Months Late and a Division Short.”  In the end, Sherman’s strategic plan to keep Forrest off of his railroads worked.

Our speaker this month is Brig. Gen. John Scales (Ret.).  An Alabama native, General Scales attended the University of Alabama 1966-70, graduating in 1970 with a degree in physics and a commission as an infantry lieutenant in the U. S. Army. He graduated from infantry officer basic, airborne and Ranger schools before being assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division. Later he led a rifle platoon in combat in Vietnam and joined the 101st Airborne upon return to the US. Leaving active duty in 1975, he joined the 20th Special Forces Group of the Alabama National Guard while getting a master’s degree at the University and becoming Special Forces qualified. Over the years, while first teaching and later working as a scientist in Huntsville, he commanded a Special Forces A Detachment, company, battalion, and the 20th itself.  He was selected for promotion to general and assignment to US Army Special Forces Command, where he was first deputy commander and later acting commander. After 9/11 he was assigned to the Joint Special Operations Command and led a Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force in Afghanistan. General Scales retired from the military in late 2002 and continued his career as a scientist in Huntsville, being granted five patents and publishing two military history books, with another scheduled to be published this summer.

Last Month’s meeting

David Deatrick, president of the Louisville CRWT, gave us a fine program on Kentucky Union General Lovell Rousseau.  He had quite the fascinating career from 1861 through war’s end.  Besides helping to keep Kentucky in the Union and training its first troops across the river in Indiana (so as to not violate the state’s declared neutrality), Rousseau also had prominent roles in several key Western Theater battles.  He also showed dexterity as a commander when he changed from commanding infantry to taking a brigade of cavalry into Alabama during the Atlanta Campaign to break the railroad from there to Atlanta.  It was the only successful Union raid of the entire campaign.  We thank David for coming to speak to us and informing us about this fascinating man.

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

 June 2017 – Jonathan Walsh, historian – “The Carter Family During the Battle of Franklin.”

July 2017 – Lee White, historian/author, Chickamauga-Chattannoga NMP – topic TBA

August 2017 – Tonya Staggs, historian, Traveler’s Rest – “Annie Claiborne and Traveler’s Rest During the Civil War”

September 2017 – Allen Mesch, historian/author – “General Charles F. Smith” (Based on his recent book.  Smith fought at Fort Donelson and his troops took Clarksville.)

October 2017 – Edward Semmes, historian – “Confederate Admiral Raphael Semmes”

November 2017 – David Lady, historian, Tennessee Valley CWRT – “Kansas Burning: The Raid On Lawrence”

December 2017 – Jim Lewis, Chief Ranger, Stones River National Battlefield – topic TBA

January 2018 – Todd Van Beck, Nashville CWRT

MEMBERS AND DUES – The membership has decided that every May will be our fiscal year.  Please plan on taking care of your membership renewals at this meeting.  The annual dues structure for the Nashville CWRT is as follows:

  • Single membership – $20
  • Family – $30
  • Military – Active duty and Veterans – $15
  • Military Family – Active duty and Veterans – $25
  • Student – $10
  • Senior (age 60 plus) – $15
  • Senior couple – $20

Your dues for the 2017-2018 fiscal year will be due at the May meeting.  Please plan on paying them at that month’s meeting if you have not already.  Your dues go to bringing in our speakers, donating to causes, etc. 

PLEASE PLAN ON PAYING YOUR DUES THIS MONTH SO WE CAN KEEP BRINGING IN GREAT SPEAKERS AND HELP SAVE CIVIL WAR SITES.

 When your dues are paid you will be issued a new ame badge with the fiscal year on it.  If you do not have a name badge then you are not current.

Our dues go to paying for speakers as well as donations for Civil War preservation causes especially those of a local nature.  Please be sure to pay your dues so we can offer the best programs possible for you!  We also utilize donated items for silent auctions each month to help add to the treasury.  If you have something you would like to donate for these auctions, please bring them to the meetings.  Books, art, or anything Civil War, works very well.  Thanks very much to all of you who have made such donations!

CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

Fort Negley Park Area Under Development Threat

On April 28th, 2017, reporter Betsy Phillips wrote the following article in the weekly Nashville Scene paper:

Developers Propose the Desecration of Fort Negley

Shame on us if we let it happen

WKRN has a story about a proposed development around Fort Negley:

On Tuesday, we heard from a developer who has big plans for the empty property (Greer Stadium site): a multi-purpose complex called Nashville Adventure Park.”

“The proposal includes senior living, luxury apartments, townhomes, affordable housing, a farmer’s market at the stadium, artisan retail and studios, restaurants, a hotel, and a wide variety of sports offerings.”

“If you imagine the hill that the main part of the fort sits on as an egg yolk, this development would be like the egg white, seeming to completely surround the fort, except for where the Adventure Science Center sits.”

“In other words, the old Catholic Cemetery and the large City Cemetery annexes that the Union opened during the Civil War would all be gone. And, fine, they’re supposed to be empty anyway, but if I were a developer, I’d put a line in my budget for dead parts removal.”

“More disturbingly and more tragically, this development sits on the site of the contraband camp, the home of thousands of black refugees during the Civil War. As Zada Law pointed out two years ago, there’s been virtually no archaeology done at any contraband camp in Tennessee.”

“We’ve already irretrievably lost whatever was under the Adventure Science Center, but a lot remains relatively undisturbed. Even the parts under the parking lot are just under a parking lot. We have not yet screwed up a crucial bit of Nashville’s African American history, even if we haven’t bothered to explore it like we should. But if we let developers have it, then that history will be lost. Sure, some archaeologists could come in and do history triage to try to learn as much as they could before it’s torn up, but the Civil War isn’t that far down in the ground. We will lose it.”

“And frankly, how much more of our Civil War history do we have to lose? We already put I-440 on top of the Confederate line and built a city on the battlefield. One of the most important battles of the Civil War and we let Franklin and Murfreesboro be the tourist destinations while we metaphorically kick the rug over what’s left of our Civil War sites.”

“Shame on us if we let this development happen.  Shame on us if we knowingly let this history slip away.”

Here is what the proposed development looks like:

aerial-view-farmers-market-rendering

Somewhere in the middle of this monstrosity lies Fort Negley and the visitors center.  Note that the parking for the latter has not been expanded.  It has been proven time and again that history tourism brings in far more money than any other – people have more to spend, stay longer, etc. if you give them something to see and promote it so they know about it.  The traffic count for the area will explode making it even more difficult to get to the fort to visit.  Don’t believe me?  Look at what has happened at the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, VA with the massive growth of Virginia Commonwealth University around it; their attendance has fallen off to the point that they are moving to new quarters down on the James River.

Traffic comes with big cities.  But traffic also drives people away from doing things just so they do not have to deal with it.  People spend enough time in traffic just going to and from work five days a week; they do not want to deal with it on weekends when they want to do something fun.

Ms. Phillips’ article also brings out the tremendous loss of historic ground upon which sits the fort and its surrounding area, which was all part of the fort’s footprint.  Shall Nashville follow the same mistaken path that Atlanta did many years ago by paving over its history from the Civil War?  How does this travesty being proposed in Nashville compare to what is happening just a few miles down the road in Franklin where they lead the nation in reclaiming lost Civil War land and restoring it to how it looked over 150 years ago?  It is a pathetic failure on Nashville’s part.

Like so many other cities, Nashville has lots of places that are basically blight that can be redeveloped into something like in the above drawing; places that are not historic Civil War lands.  How about moving this thing there instead and leave Fort Negley be?

If you want to help stop this development, please contact the Mayor of Nashville, Megan Berry, and the Nashville Metro City Council.  You should also contact the City of Nashville Metro Parks department and let them know how you feel about this.  The city’s web site is www.nashville.govLet them hear the voices of the Civil War community of America and stop this development.

By Greg Biggs (The above is the opinion of Greg Biggs, a member of the Nashville CWRT and not necessarily the opinion of the Nashville CWRT as a whole or the staff of Fort Negley Park, a unit of Nashville Metro City parks.)

Kennesaw State University in Georgia Announces New Seminar – June 2017

General Orders, Headquarters, Kennesaw, Ga., May 2017
Next on the power-packed schedule for 2017 are the Second Annual Vince Dooley Leadership Seminar on June 17 and the ever-popular Collector’s Showcase on July 22. In addition to the legendary coach himself, Craig Symonds highlights the program for the Dooley Seminar, with an examination of leadership exhibited during the crucial D-Day operation in the Second World War, while Dr. Wills will assess unique aspects of Civil War leadership.

Although operating through the University, the Civil War Center depends upon the generous financial contributions of friends and donors to function. We could not offer programs such as these without your support and attendance. This critical assistance builds the foundation for future activities and enables the Center to serve both students and members of the wider public community. We continue to invite you to join or re-enroll in the Kennesaw Corps Annual Membership through which members receive special discounts or admission to many of the Center’s activities. Please plan to join us at all of these events and bring friends so that they can see the enthusiasm and excitement for themselves and enjoy the educational opportunities they provide. We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

Kentucky Historical Society Hosts Seminar On Kentucky’s Civil War Governors – June 2017

The Kentucky Historical Society presents:

2017 Civil War Governors of Kentucky Symposium

June 8 & 9

Join us as we bring together noted historians to help chart the future of 19th century historiography in the Upper South. Faculty and graduate students will have a rare opportunity to see new trends and important research questions developing before they are in print.

 

Twelve prominent scholars from universities across the U.S. and Great Britain will gather to present new work from the Civil War Governors of Kentucky Digital Documentary Edition and discuss the new types of analysis that this innovative digital history project will allow historians to undertake.

 

Sessions all day on June 8 and on the morning of June 9 in the historic Old State Capitol will feature discussions centered on new work on warfare, gender, economics, material culture, slavery and more.
Click here for more information about participants and topics.
Workshop Session on the afternoon of June 8 for teachers at all levels and public historians will collaboratively address ways to incorporate CWGK primary sources into creative and innovative classroom activities and exhibits.

 

Lunch & Reception included in ticket price will give guests the opportunity to interact and network with symposium participants.

 

The keynote speaker is Edward L. Ayres.

 

$25 KHS Members and Students* | $30 Others Price includes box lunch and evening reception.   Reservations required by 5 p.m., June 5.  Call 502-564-1792, ext. 4408

 

The Kentucky Historical Society is located at 100 W. Broadway, Frankfort KY 40601

KHSMedia@ky.gov  (502) 564-1792

January Meeting Notice and Newsletter

January 16th, 2017 – Our 94th meeting!!  We continue our seventh year. 

 

The next meeting of the Nashville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Monday, January 17th, 2017, in the visitor’s center of Ft. Negley Park, a unit of Metro Parks, Nashville, TN.  This is located off I-65 just south of downtown between 4th Avenue South and 8th Avenue South on Edgehill Avenue/Chestnut Avenue.  Take Exit 81, Wedgewood Avenue, off I-65 and follow the signs to the Science Museum.

 

The meeting begins at 7:00 PM and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

 

Our Speaker and Topic  – “Washington County, Virginia In The Civil War”

 

If you take a drive up I-81 in East Tennessee, once you cross into Virginia at Bristol you are in Washington County.  The county seat is Abingdon.  Tied to Tennessee both geographically and via the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, the history of this region is very much the same on both sides of the state line.  Ten companies would recruit from Washington County and serve in the Army of Northern Virginia among other commands.  The county also turned out six Confederate generals, including former Secretary of War John Floyd, who commanded the Confederate garrison at Fort Donelson.  Others include William E. “Grumble” Jones and Joseph E. Johnston.

 

The county also became a vital region for resources and supplies for the Confederate military and included, besides crops and animals, the salt from the mines at Saltville, Virginia.  This made the county a target for Union cavalry raids and some smaller battles of the war with Union officers George Stoneman, Alvan Gillem and Stephen Burbridge all taking part.  Additionally, Abingdon would become the headquarters for a Confederate departmental command.

 

Speaking to us this month on Washington County in the Civil War is Michael Shaffer, from Kennesaw, Georgia.  He holds BA and MA degrees in Military History and serves on the board of the Chattahoochee River Line Historic Area as well as being a member of the Society of Civil War Historians, Historians of the Civil War Western Theater and is the consultant for the Friends of Camp McDonald, which was a major Georgia troops training camp in Kennesaw.  Michael writes a regular column for Civil War News and is also an instructor at Kennesaw State University in the Civil War field and lectures across the country.

 

He is also the author of the book, “Washington County in the Civil War,” and will have copies of his book for sale at the meeting.

 

Please join us as Michael Shaffer takes us to neighboring Virginia and tells us of the events in Washington County from 1861 to 1865.

 

 

 

Last Month’s meeting

 

Unfortunately, Dr. James McDonough had to cancel due to illness last month and we hope to have him later this year.

 

Our own Krista Castillo gave us a fine program comparing and contrasting women in the Civil War era and World War One.    The changes in American society in the Civil War with so many women going to work in ordnance and quartermaster facilities in addition to becoming nurses changed the social structure of the time.  Women indeed showed they could do a number of jobs outside of the home – and this did not count the women who ran family farms while their husbands were in the military.  It set the tone for World War 1, where women not only did many of the same jobs as those in the Civil War, but they also served in the military itself in a number of positions that freed up men for the combat arms.  The program was well detailed with slides including a number of World War One propaganda posters that featured women urging them to step up to the defense of their nation.  Well researched and presented, Krista did a fine job of connecting the women of the two eras.  Thanks for stepping in on very short notice.

 

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

 

February 2017 – Brian Allison, historian/author – program based on his upcoming book, “Murder And Mayhem In Nashville.”

March 2017 – Phillip Whiteman, historian, Marietta, GA. – “The Civil War Sutler – Shyster or

Shrewd Businessman?”

April 2017 – Allen Mesch, historian/author – “General Charles F. Smith” (Based on his recent book.  Smith fought at Fort Donelson and his troops took Clarksville.)

 

MEMBERS AND DUES – The membership has decided that every May will be our fiscal year.  Please plan on taking care of your membership renewals at this meeting.  The annual dues structure for the Nashville CWRT is as follows:

 

Single membership – $20
Family – $30
Military – Active duty and Veterans – $15
Military Family – Active duty and Veterans – $25
Student – $10
Senior (age 60 plus) – $15
Senior couple – $20

 

Your dues for the 2015-2016 fiscal year are now due.  Please plan on paying them at this month’s meeting if you have not already.  Your dues go to bringing in our speakers, donating to causes, etc.  If you are current you will have four stars on your name badge.

 

PLEASE PLAN ON PAYING YOUR DUES AT THIS MEETING SO WE CAN KEEP BRINGING IN GREAT SPEAKERS AND HELP SAVE CIVIL WAR SITES.

 

When your dues are paid you will be issued a new name badge with the fiscal year on it.  If you do not have a name badge then you are not current.

 

Our dues go to paying for speakers as well as donations for Civil War preservation causes especially those of a local nature.  Please be sure to pay your dues so we can offer the best programs possible for you!  We also utilize donated items for silent auctions each month to help add to the treasury.  If you have something you would like to donate for these auctions, please bring them to the meetings.  Books, art, or anything Civil War, works very well.  Thanks very much to all of you who have made such donations!

 

CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

 

Want A Tour of the Shiloh Battlefield?  Try David Stewart.

 

If you are heading to Shiloh National Military Park and want something much more than driving around that wonderful site with the Park Service brochure, then a personal guided tour is the thing for you.  David Stewart, of Collierville, TN, offers guided tours of this wonderful battlefield and has been doing so for quite some time.

 

For information about his tours, which include more than Shiloh (like Gettysburg, Brice’s Crossroads and more), what they entail and costs, please visit his web site at – www.shilohcivilwartours.com.  A schedule of group tours and their locations is also posted on the web site.

 

The Civil War On Television (Courtesy of the Cleveland CWRT newsletter)

 

Here’s some Civil War TV programs for your enjoyment.  Nice to see these – hope we can get even more!

 

Antiques Roadshow: The Civil War Years – Artifacts: WVIZ/PBS Monday, January 23, 2017 (8 PM and 3 rebroadcasts)

 

Lincoln Assassination: American Experience (PBS.org) will broadcast “The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln” on January 17, 2017 at 8 PM (ET).

 

More Civil War Television That You Can Watch On Your Computer (Courtesy of the Des Moines, IA CWRT newsletter)

 

C-Span does regular interviews with all sorts of authors including noted Civil War historians.  Please find here a link to the broadcast of Dr. Earl Hess, noted author and professor of history at Lincoln Memorial University in East Tennessee on “Civil War Weapons and Tactics.” This is based on his recent book on the topic which continues the trend of challenging the myth of the rifle musket as being the cause for so much slaughter in the war.

 

https://www.c-span.org/video/?416997-4/civil-war-infantry-tactics-weapons

 

You might spend some time on their web site for other Civil War programs they offer.

December News and Meeting Info

December 21st, 2015 – Our 81st meeting!!  We continue our seventh year.  

 

The next meeting of the Nashville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Monday, December 21st, 2015, in the visitor’s center of Ft. Negley Park, a unit of Metro Parks, Nashville, TN.  This is located off I-65 just south of downtown between 4th Avenue South and 8th Avenue South on Edgehill Avenue/Chestnut Avenue.  Take Exit 81, Wedgewood Avenue, off I-65 and follow the signs to the Science Museum.  The meeting begins at 7:00 PM and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

 

Our Speaker and Topic    – “Religion In The Civil War”

Religion had a powerful impact on American life both before and during the Civil War.  The topic is a growing research point as evidenced by books, essays and more.  This program will examine how ministers used the impending war, not only to make political implications, but also more importantly, to acknowledge the spiritual realities that war awakens in all who endure it.  In addition to the program our speaker will do a brief excerpt from an actual sermon (Christian Duty in the Present Time of Trouble) by Episcopal Bishop of North Carolina, the Right Rev.Thomas Atkinson preached in May 1861.  This promises to be both a unique and very interesting program offering great insights to how religion was so important to the North and South in the 1860s.

Please join us as Rev. Alan Corry offers these insights at our February 2015 meeting.  Alan is originally from Texas, and has lived in Franklin, TN since 1999.  He has worked for the Battle of Franklin Trust (the Carter House and Carnton Plantation) for 8 years.  Alan’s background is in ministry with two Masters from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (Christian Education and Marriage and Family Counseling).  He has worked on both small and large church staffs through the years and served as a Hospice Chaplain before going to work for the Carter House.  Alan founded Time Capsule Ministries as a way to use his love of history combined with a call to ministry to reach people by reenacting historical sermons.  He is a descendant of two Civil War veterans – both served in the Confederacy. He and his wife, Carla, are about to celebrate their 25th Anniversary this year and they have two teenage children; one in high school the other attending college.

 

Last Month’s meeting

 

Gene Andrews, U.S. Marine Corps veteran and a fixture in the Tennessee Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, gave is a fascinating program on the Confederate States Marine Corps.  Never more than 600 officers and men, CS Marines guarded and fought aboard warships, guarded ports, fought in land battles at Fort Fisher, Drewry’s Bluff and Sailor’s Creek and sailed the world as part of the CSS Shenandoah, which did not end its war career until November 1865.  Gene brought their stories to life telling of their valor and dedication to their small service thanks in part to many of its founders being former U.S. Marines and carrying on that tradition.  Thanks Gene for a fine program.  The U.S. Marine Corps Museum in Quantico, VA features the Confederate Marines as part of its exhibit of the Civil War.

 

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

 

January 2016 – Howard Mann, Nashville CWRT – “The Alton, Illinois Prisoner of War Camp”

February 2016 – Ross Massey, author/historian – “General William Bate of Tennessee”

March 2016 – Robert Hodge, filmmaker/historian – “The Battle of Spotsylvania” (based on his recent film)

April 2016 – Tom Parson, Corinth National Battlefield, historian/author – “Work For Giants: The Battle of Tupelo” (based on his recent book)

May 2016 – Brian KcKnight, University of Virginia/Wise, historian/author – “Champ Ferguson”

Spring 2016 – James McDonough, historian/author – “General William T. Sherman”  (Based on his new book)

 

MEMBERS AND DUES– The membership has decided that every May will be our fiscal year.  Please plan on taking care of your membership renewals at this meeting.  The annual dues structure for the Nashville CWRT is as follows:

 

Single membership – $20
Family – $30
Military – Active duty and Veterans – $15
Military Family – Active duty and Veterans – $25
Student – $10
Senior (age 60 plus) – $15
Senior couple – $20

 

Your dues for the 2015-2016 fiscal year are now due.  Please plan on paying them at this month’s meeting if you have not already.  Your dues go to bringing in our speakers, donating to causes, etc.  If you are current you will have four stars on your name badge.

 

PLEASE PLAN ON PAYING YOUR DUES AT THIS MEETING SO WE CAN KEEP BRINGING IN GREAT SPEAKERS AND HELP SAVE CIVIL WAR SITES.

 

When your dues are paid your name badge with four stars on it will be available at the following meetingIf your badge does not have three stars on it then you are not current.  Our dues go to paying for speakers as well as donations for Civil War preservation causes especially those of a local nature.  Please be sure to pay your dues so we can offer the best programs possible for you!  We also utilize donated items for silent auctions each month to help add to the treasury.  If you have something you would like to donate for these auctions, please bring them to the meetings.  Books, art, or anything Civil War, works very well.  Thanks very much to all of you who have made such donations!

 

CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

 

Nashville CWRT Christmas Party

 

This month’s meeting will feature the annual Christmas party and we can use some help with refreshments.  Cookies, brownies, soft drinks, tea, etc. (and especially brownies!) would be helpful so if you bake or buy, please bring what you can to the meeting this month.

 

Do not miss Santa Gary either as our jolly Vice President hands out some Christmas cheer as he does so well each year.

 

Tennessee Civil War Preservation Association Announce Next Three Star Tour – December 12, 2015

 

The Battle of Sugar Creek

 

TCWPA’s next Three-Star Battlefield Tour will be on Saturday morning,  December 12th.  Join Dr. Kevin Gray and Joe Fowlkes for an exciting tour of the site of the last major Civil War battle in Tennessee: The Battle of Sugar Creek, December 26, 1864.  The tour will begin in Pulaski and on the way to the privately-owned Sugar Creek Battlefield we’ll visit at least two other Civil War sites.  Sugar Creek is where the rear guard of the Army of Tennessee under Nathan Bedford Forrest, with attached infantry, drubbed the pursuing Federals allowing the army to cross into Alabama and safety.  This tour will be through some very pretty parts of Tennessee on a little known but nearly pristine battlefield.

 

Here is the link for online registration: http://www.tcwpa.org/event/three-star-tour-battle-of-sugar-creek-december-12-2015/

Tour Details

  • 8:00-8:30 am:  Check-in and Welcome in downtown Pulaski
  • 8:30 am:         Tour departs Pulaski
  • 1:00 pm:         Tour concludes
  • Car-pooling from Pulaski recommended
  • Rain or Shine – the tour goes.
  • Walking distance:  approximately 1 mile (total) at Sugar Creek on level pastureland.

Additional tour information will be sent to participants prior to the tour.  

 

The tour is free and open to the public.  Pre-registration will be required as the number of participants is limited.    For more information and to reserve your space contact TCWPA at – info@tcwpa.org.  Visit their web site at – www.tcwpa.org

 

71st Anniversary Battle of the Bulge Seminar at Fort Negley – Saturday, December 19th, 2015

 

On Saturday, December 19, 2015, Fort Negley will host a daylong seminar honoring the 71st anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge, the largest battle of the European Theater involving American and British troops.  On December 16, 1944, Adolf Hitler, hoping to destroy the Allied armies in the Ardennes, to capture Antwerp, and to regain a foothold in the west, launched Germany’s final major offensive on the Western Front.  Although the German advance created a bulging wedge in the lines, American troops refused to break.  After ten days of heavy fighting, Allied reinforcements arrived.  The costly counterattack prevented the Germans from reaching their first objective, regaining captured ground.

 

This free seminar will begin at 9:30 AM and last until 4:30 PM with a one-hour break for lunch.  Attendees are encouraged to bring a sack lunch and tour Fort Negley during the break.  The seminar at Fort Negley will be a condensed version of the eight-part Battle of the Bulge series created by local Clarksville historians and Austin Peay State University history department faculty that took place earlier this year.

 

Related displays will include memorabilia and uniforms from the 106th Infantry Division, which had two regiments cut off and captured by the Germans in the Bulge, as well as World War II scale models crafted by members of a Nashville-based group.  World War II veterans are especially invited to share their experiences at the Battle of the Bulge.

 

9:45 AM – The U.S. Army From D-Day to the Ardennes, presented by William Parker, professor,

Austin Peay State University; director, Fort Defiance Interpretive Center, Clarksville, TN

 

10:45 AM – Wacht Am Rhein: The Germans in the Battle of the Bulge, presented by Greg Biggs,

military historian, Clarksville, TN

 

11:45 AM – Lunch on Your Own

 

12:45 PM – My Experience in the Battle of the Bulge, presented by Michael Freeland, veteran, 82nd

Airborne Division; author, Hopkinsville, KY (Mr. Freeland will have copies of his book for sale at this event)

 

1:45 PM – The 106th Infantry Division: The Golden Lions in the Battle of the Bulge, presented by John

Schuler, veteran, U.S. Army Special Forces; historian, Clarksville, TN

 

2:45 PM – The Conquest and American Occupation of Germany, presented by Dewey Browder, PhD, Lt. Col. US

Army (Ret); Professor Emeritus of History, Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, TN

 

3:45 PM – Panel Discussion

 

Seating is limited.  To make reservations or to receive more information, please contact Fort Negley Visitors Center at 615-862-8470 or fortnegley@nashville.gov.

 

Confederate Battle Flag Captured at Franklin, November 30th, 1864, Goes On Display at Carnton in Franklin For One Year

 

The battle flag of the 7th Texas Infantry, captured at Franklin in late November 1864 by the 24th Wisconsin Infantry and brought back to Wisconsin, is now on display in the museum at Carnton Plantation in Franklin.  The flag, part of a private collection, has been loaned to Carnton by its owner.  It was brought back to Wisconsin after the battle and remained there for many years being placed on display in the home town of the captor, a former captain of the 24th Wisconsin.  Thought to have been lost, the banner turned up in 2014 and was purchased and has now been conserved.

 

Although part of Patrick Cleburne’s Division, famous for their blue and white battle flags, the 7th Texas reverted to a flag issued to them in either late 1862 or early 1863 after their exchange from their capture at Fort Donelson.  This flag bears the Southern Cross (or saltier in flag terminology), the unit designation and a series of battle honors.  Unique to this flag is its fifteen white stars, a trademark of several flags associated with units and officer stationed in Mississippi where the Fort Donelson POW exchanges took place.  The flag is identical in style and construction to that of the 50th Tennessee Infantry at the Tennessee State Museum.  According to its history, the flag last flew at Missionary Ridge before being replaced by a Cleburne battle flag when the 7th Texas joined that division in 1864.  That flag remains missing today.

 

Brig. Gen. Hiram Granbury, killed leading his Texas Brigade at Franklin, was originally a company commander in the 7th Texas and was captured with the regiment at Fort Donelson.  The regiment arrived in the Tennessee theater in late 1861 and was first posted to Hopkinsville, KY where their ranks, and those of the Mississippi troops stationed there as well, were decimated by measles and other diseases.  The regiment fought in the Vicksburg Campaign at Raymond and other battles before coming back to Tennessee after Chickamauga.

 

This is a great chance to see a banner captured at Franklin that is not part of any museum collection.

July Newsletter and Meeting Notice

July 20th, 2015 – Our 76th meeting!!  We continue our seventh year.  

The next meeting of the Nashville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Monday, July 20th, 2015, in the visitor’s center of Ft. Negley Park, a unit of Metro Parks, Nashville, TN.  This is located off I-65 just south of downtown between 4th Avenue South and 8th Avenue South on Edgehill Avenue/Chestnut Avenue.  Take Exit 81, Wedgewood Avenue, off I-65 and follow the signs to the Science Museum.  The meeting begins at 7:00 PM and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

Our Speaker and Topic    – “Yorktown: Where the Revolution and Civil War Overlapped”

 

Union General George McClellan and his large Army of the Potomac (121,000 troops), began its advance up the Virginia Peninsula in March 1862 when his troops were shipped by sea to the area around Fortress Monroe.  After everything was completed, his army headed towards Richmond with the thinking that the capture of the Confederate capitol would end the war.  Holding the lower Peninsula was the small (11,000 troops) of Confederate Gen. John Magruder and his Army of the Peninsula.

Magruder dug a line of entrenchments and forts across the region even using trenches built for the Revolutionary War Battle of Yorktown dubbed the Warwick Line.  McClellan drew up and prepared to lay siege in a set piece fight to drive out Magruder.  With fighting taking place at Lee’s Mills and Dam Number One in early April, McClellan had underestimated Magruder’s defenses.  These events brought a large Confederate reaction as the Army of Northern Virginia, deployed around Richmond and other towns of that area, was sent down the Peninsula to reinforce Magruder.  Eventually, the Confederates forced a siege which played more to McClellan’s strengths as an engineer officer who had brought heavy artillery with him just for that purpose.  New Confederate commander, Gen. Joseph Johnston, decided that the question was the better part of valor and, after sending his supply wagons back to Richmond, slowly withdrew his army to hold in Richmond’s defenses.

The follow up to the fighting at Yorktown, Jamestown, Williamsburg and the Confederate retreat up the Peninsula came in late May when Johnston struck back at Seven Pines.  That battle stopped McClellan but did not defeat him.  That event took place starting in late June when Robert E. Lee struck back in the Seven Days battles finally driving McClellan back from Richmond saving the capitol.

This month’s program offers the twists and turns and events of the fighting at Yorktown.  Teaching us this month is National park Service ranger Robert Dunkerly.  On the staff of the Richmond National Battlefield park in Virginia, he has led tours of Yorktown, Seven Pines sites and other Peninsula sites over the years.

Robert M. Dunkerly is a historian, award-winning author, and speaker who is actively involved in historic preservation and research.  He holds a degree in History from St. Vincent College and a Masters in Historic Preservation from Middle Tennessee State University.  He has worked at nine historic sites, written twelve books and over twenty articles on both the Civil War and Revolutionary War.  His research includes archaeology, colonial life, military history, and historic commemoration.  He is currently President of the Richmond Civil War Round Table, and serves on the Preservation Commission for the American Revolution Round Table-Richmond.  He has taught courses at Central Virginia Community College, the University of Richmond, and the Virginia Historical Society.  Dunkerly is currently a Park Ranger at Richmond National Battlefield Park.  He has visited over 400 battlefields and over 900 historic sites worldwide.  When not reading or writing, he enjoys hiking, camping, and photography.

Last Month’s meeting

 

We were indeed lucky to have noted Tennessee based author and speaker Randy Bishop visit with us for the June program.  As always, he informs and entertains and is about the nicest guy you could ever meet.  We look forward to having him back in the future for another program.  If you missed the meeting please check out his several Civil War books including The Tennessee Brigade, Tennessee Confederate Generals and battlefields of Tennessee, Kentucky and other states.

 

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

August 2015 – Greg Bayne, American Civil War Roundtable of the United Kingdom – “Henry Hotze and the Confederate Index; Confederate Propaganda in Britain”

September 2015 – Dr. Sybril Bennett, professor/author, Belmont University – “The Underground Railroad”

October 2015 – Wayne Motts, Director, National Civil War Museum, Harrisburg, PA – “The Civil War Through Artifacts”

November 2015 – Gene Andrews, N.B. Forrest Home/historian –“The Confederate States Marine Corps”

December 2015 – Alan Corry, pastor/historian – “Religion in the Civil War”

January 2016 – Howard Mann, Nashville CWRT – “The Alton, Illinois Prisoner of War Camp”

March 2016 – Robert Hodge, filmmaker/historian – “The Battle of Spotsylvania” (based on his recent film)

Spring 2016 – James McDonough, historian/author – “General William T. Sherman”  (Based on his new book)

MEMBERS AND DUES– The membership has decided that every May will be our fiscal year.  Please plan on taking care of your membership renewals at this meeting.  The annual dues structure for the Nashville CWRT is as follows:

Single membership – $20
Family – $30
Military – Active duty and Veterans – $15
Military Family – Active duty and Veterans – $25
Student – $10
Senior (age 60 plus) – $15
Senior couple – $20

Your dues for the 2015-2016 fiscal year are now due.  Please plan on paying them at this month’s meeting if you have not already.  Your dues go to bringing in our speakers, donating to causes, etc.  If you are current you will have four stars on your name badge.

 

PLEASE PLAN ON PAYING YOUR DUES AT THE MAY 2015 MEETING SO WE CAN KEEP BRINGING IN GREAT SPEAKERS AND HELP SAVE CIVIL WAR SITES.

When your dues are paid your name badge with four stars on it will be available at the following meetingIf your badge does not have three stars on it then you are not current.  Our dues go to paying for speakers as well as donations for Civil War preservation causes especially those of a local nature.  Please be sure to pay your dues so we can offer the best programs possible for you!  We also utilize donated items for silent auctions each month to help add to the treasury.  If you have something you would like to donate for these auctions, please bring them to the meetings.  Books, art, or anything Civil War, works very well.  Thanks very much to all of you who have made such donations!

CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

Johnsonville State Historic Park Event – Saturday, July 18th, 2015 Features the One and Only Thomas Cartwright

Company “Aytch” Campfire by the Lake

Johnsonville State Historic Park is proud to feature renowned Civil War historian, Mr. Thomas Cartwright of Brentwood, Tennessee, as he performs an amazing, one-man theatrical performance as Confederate private Sam Watkins in “Company Aytch: A Side Show of the Big Show.”  As a first-person performance, you will be drawn directly into the horrors and even the comedies of the Civil War and get to hear first-hand.  Watkins’ amazing experiences are seen from the eyes of a private soldier during the Civil War.  Please arrive early enough to allow for parking and to get a good seat for the “not to be missed” one time only performance.  The program starts at 8 PM but come early to explore this beautiful and historic state park on the Tennessee River.  For more information call the park at 931-535-2789

The park is located off US Highway 70 at New Johnsonville, TN.  Take I-40 west to Exit 143 and turn right following the signs to New Johnsonville.  If you go to Waverly to reach US 70 be sure to stop and visit their Civil War fort up on the hill above the town.  Then head west on US 70 to the park.

 

Fort Donelson National Battlefield Ranger “Battle Chats” – July 2015 Through September 26th, 2015

 

Join a Park Ranger and learn a bit more about the park, the stories we preserve and share, and the resources we protect for future generations.   Meet the Park Ranger at these locations:

(Program will be cancelled in case of inclement weather, intense heat, or staff shortages.)

11:00 am {Every Day} Stop #4, the River Batteries

3:00 pm {Every Day} The Dover Hotel, Stop #10

1:00 pm Sundays: The Fort Stop #3

1:00 pm Mondays: The Confederate Monument, Stop #1

1:00 pm Tuesdays: Smith’s Attack, Stop #5

1:00 pm Wednesdays: Graves Battery, Stop #7

1:00 pm Thursdays: The National Cemetery / Free-State, Stop #11

1:00 pm Fridays: Smith’s Attack Stop #5

1:00 pm Saturdays: National Cemetery/ Free State, Stop #11

 

 

Atlanta Campaign  Tour Part 2 – The River Line To Jonesboro – October 21st through 25th, 2015

 

Here we go again for the second portion of the Atlanta Campaign tour sponsored by the Lotz House Civil War Museum of Franklin, TN.

The new dates for the tour are Wednesday, October 21st, 2015 through Sunday, October 25th, 2015.  As with last year the tour leaves from Franklin, Tennessee and returns there with parking by the Lotz House as before.  We will tour Joe Johnston’s River Line, Roswell and the Chattahoochie River crossings, the Battles of Moore’s Mill and Peachtree Creek, the Battle of Atlanta,  Ezra Church and Jonesboro. On the way back to Tennessee we will stop at Allatoona Pass battlefield, site of the first battle of Hood’s Tennessee Campaign.

We will also include stops at the Atlanta History Center (one of the finest Civil War museums in the country), the Margaret Mitchell House, the Road to Tara Museum and more.  We will also tour some of Oakland Cemetery where John Bell Hood watched the Battle of Atlanta.  A full itinerary is forthcoming next week for you.

It looks like the prices will be the same as the tour offered in March and I will have these rates sent to you as part of the full tour email.  There is a deadline for doing the tour of September 15 – we need 30 sold and paid for seats for the tour to go.  Refunds are only by substitution of another which you find or if trip does not mature.   There will be rates for single, double and triple room occupancy so you can work that out with friends among yourselves and take the tour together.  We can also post names and contact information of those seeking room mates as well.

Tour guides, as before, will be Greg Biggs and Robert Jenkins.  Bob is THE expert on Moore’s Mill and Peachtree Creek and has done deep research on Ezra Church as well.  He helped us with the Dalton portion of the tour last year.  He has books out on Peachtree Creek and a recent one on Moore’s Mill and the approaches to the Chattahoochee River by Sherman’s army.  Greg has been giving Atlanta tours since 1993 and spent many years walking the fields and has also been published on the campaign.

We will also have three Atlanta historians to speak to us on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights.  We have tentatively scheduled Stephen Davis, noted Atlanta scholar and author (he has a great piece on the Battle of Resaca in the current Blue & Gray magazine in fact) who has written two books on the campaign and is a very entertaining speaker; Brad Butkovich, author of the recent book on the Battle of Allatoona Pass; and Charlie Crawford, president of the Georgia Battlefield Association who will speak to us on efforts to save battlefields in the growing sprawl of Atlanta and other places in Georgia.

So save the date folks!  We look forward to having you join us on the second portion of the Atlanta Campaign tour.  Proceeds will benefit the Lotz House Civil War Museum, a 501 (c) 3 organization.  If interested in the details please send an email to Greg Biggs at – Biggsg@charter.net

Updated Information On Confederate Colonels Now Online

 

Professor Bruce Allardice, author of “Confederate Colonels: A Biographical Register” (U. of Missouri, 2008) has posted on his website a list of updates to that book, compiled as new information and new sources have become available.  The book includes short biographies of numerous area colonels, such as David A. Lynn and William A. Forbes of Clarksville, and Randal McGavock of Nashville.  Among the new material is updates on Nashville area colonels, such as William S. Hawkins’ newly discovered place of burial.  The new research adds new detail to the book; adds a “new” colonel (John C. Tracy of MO). Bruce is always seeking new information so if you have something to share that is not in his wonderful nook or on his web site please contact him and elt him know.

Bruce’s website is www.civilwarbruce.com. The book, loaded with tremendous research and details, is available through the publisher, or Amazon.com.
NASHVILLE CWRT OFFICERS

 

Krista Castillo – President – Krista.Castillo@nashville.gov

Gary Burke – Vice President – Escaped886@yahoo.com

Philip Duer – Treasurer and Preservation Liason – pwduer@gmail.com

Greg Biggs – Program Chair – Biggsg@charter.net

November Newsletter and Meeting Notice

November 17th, 2014 – Our 69th Meeting!! We continue our sixth year!

The next meeting of the Nashville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Monday, November 17th, 2014, in the visitor’s center of Ft. Negley Park, a unit of Metro Parks, Nashville, TN. This is located off I-65 just south of downtown between 4th Avenue South and 8th Avenue South on Edgehill Avenue/Chestnut Avenue. Take Exit 81, Wedgewood Avenue, off I-65 and follow the signs to the Science Museum. The meeting begins at 7:00 PM and is always open to the public. Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

Our Speaker and Topic – “The Battle of Franklin; Five Hours Beyond Hell’s Threshold”

We in Middle Tennessee are now entering our second part of the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War. Two years ago we commemorated Fort Donelson, the fall of Clarksville and Nashville, various smaller battles and raids ending with the Battle of Stones River. We now are back in the national limelight with John Bell Hood’s Tennessee Campaign of October-December 1864. Within this are battles in Georgia (Allatoona Pass); Alabama (Decatur) and, of course, Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville.

The program this month will focus on the Battle of Franklin, whose five hours of combat are probably the most intense of the entire Civil War. Charge after charge against entrenched Federals, some armed with repeating weapons and backed with artillery, assaulted by the Confederates with little artillery support and single shot muskets. Six generals fell; over 50 regimental commanders, numerous field grade officers and some 7000 plus men before the fighting was over when darkness ended it. The Confederate Army of Tennessee was gutted and Union Gen. John Schofield was able to move his army, its mission of delay accomplished, to the safety of the massive fortifications of Nashville.

Franklin has been the subject of numerous campaign and battle books but this month we will get to hear historian Robert Cross’ interpretation of the battle. Rob has studied this fight for many years as part of his career as a military historian in Middle Tennessee. His impassioned deliver and knowledge of the battle will be on display when he delivers his program to the Nashville Civil War Roundtable this month.

Rob Cross is a military historian, with his area of expertise concentrated on the American Civil War, and the Vietnam War. Since his formal training at the University of Memphis, he has worked in multiple battlefields and Civil War sites including The Carter House, Carnton Plantation, Belle Meade, and Rippavilla Plantation. He has presented programs across Middle Tennessee tom conferences and historical groups and is an experienced tour guide. He is the current Military Historian for Franklin on Foot, and lives in Columbia, Tennessee, where he continues ongoing education in his tradecraft.

Last Month’s Program

We certainly appreciate the fine program by author and historian Scott Sallee on the Civil War in Northeast Missouri and the Palmyra massacre. The Trans-Mississippi theater was important to the war but it little studied by many people today. Thankfully, historians like Scott bring this theater to life via their lectures, research and books. If you were not able to attend this meeting, Scott is a member of the Nashville CWRT and he would be happy to get you a copy of his book on this program and sign it for you. Thanks Scott for the excellent program.

FUTURE PROGRAMS:
December 2014 – Brian Allison , historian – “The USCT Troops in the Battle of Nashville”
January 2015 – James Knight, historian/author – Hood’s Tennessee Campaign” (based on his recent book)
March 2015 – Mark Hoffman, historian/author – The 1st Michigan Engineers and Mechanics in Middle Tennessee” (from his book)
August 2015 – Greg Bayne, American Civil War Roundtable of the United Kingdom – “Henry Hotze and the Confederate Index; Confederate Propaganda in Britain”

MEMBERS AND DUES– The membership has decided that every May will be our fiscal year. Please plan on taking care of your membership renewals at this meeting. The annual dues structure for the Nashville CWRT is as follows:

Single membership – $20
Family – $30
Military – Active duty and Veterans – $15
Military Family – Active duty and Veterans – $25
Student – $10
Senior (age 60 plus) – $15
Senior couple – $20

Your dues for the 2014-2015 fiscal year are now due. Please plan on paying them at this month’s meeting if you have not already. Your dues go to bringing in our speakers, donating to causes, etc. If you are current you will have four stars on your name badge.

When your dues are paid your name badge with four stars on it will be available at the following meeting. If your badge does not have three stars on it then you are not current. Our dues go to paying for speakers as well as donations for Civil War preservation causes especially those of a local nature. Please be sure to pay your dues so we can offer the best programs possible for you! We also utilize donated items for silent auctions each month to help add to the treasury. If you have something you would like to donate for these auctions, please bring them to the meetings. Books, art, or anything Civil War, works very well. Thanks very much to all of you who have made such donations!

CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

Middle Tennessee Civil War 150th Events Across Our Area – November-December, 2014

From Spring Hill to Nashville, Middle Tennessee will have a plethora of events to observe the events of 150 years ago. There’s far too many to list here but visit the websites of these organizations for more details and events:

The Lotz House, Carter House, Carnton Mansion in Franklin for tours, events, Ed Bearss dinner and tour and much more. In Nashville, the Battle of Nashville Preservation Society will be part of the many events planned including a symposium, tours and more. Visit their web site and those of Belle Meade, Traveler’s Rest, Fort Negley and others for the information and dates that you need to support them.

Short newsletter this month folks due to my work schedule this time of the year. I really need to move the newsletter duties to someone else as I no longer have the time to write it. Hopefully someone can step forward to do so for the sake of our CWRT.

July Newsletter and Meeting Notice

July 14th, 2014 – Our 64th Meeting!! We continue our sixth year! A special SECOND Monday meeting!

The next meeting of the Nashville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Monday, July 14th, 2014, in the visitor’s center of Ft. Negley Park, a unit of Metro Parks, Nashville, TN. This is located off I-65 just south of downtown between 4th Avenue South and 8th Avenue South on Edgehill Avenue/Chestnut Avenue. Take Exit 81, Wedgewood Avenue, off I-65 and follow the signs to the Science Museum. The meeting begins at 7:00 PM and is always open to the public. Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

OUR SPEAKER AND TOPIC – “Canada and the Civil War”

Our great neighbor to the north, Canada, was one of the crown jewels of the British Empire in the mid-19th Century. Much is known about how Britain was outraged when one of her steamships was stopped by a U.S. Navy vessel carrying two Confederate diplomats, James Mason and John Slidell. Britain dispatched troops to the Dominion of Canada but cooler heads prevailed. The United State could not fight the Confederates and Great Britain at the same time. Somewhat less known was the activities of the Confederate Secret Service that operated out of Canada. This is about the extent of Canada’s involvement in the American Civil War that most people have heard of. But there was much more.

This month’s special speaker, Conrad Laplante, president of the Ottawa Civil War Roundtable, will bring to our meeting this month an in depth look on how Canada was affected by our Civil War, American-Canadian relations and how the Civil War actually caused Canada. The war was indeed a shared experience.

That being said, there is much that is little known about the Canadian involvement in that amazing conflict. Just look at the index of any of the major works on the Civil War and search for Canada or Canadians and you will find little mention. This program will correct that error. Many of the facts and figures that will be presented will come as quite a surprise. Without giving away too much, there were thousands of Canadians who participated. The blood of Canadians is in the ground of just about every battlefield of the Civil War. We have some heroes, villains, and untold numbers of ordinary soldiers, some of whom achieved remarkable things. All of these stories will be part of the program.

Conrad Laplante was born and raised in Ottawa, the capital of Canada. After a full career with the military (retired as chief warrant officer, Militia) and government civil service, he now devotes his time to studying American-Canadian relations. Conrad graduated from the University of Ottawa with a BA (Honours) History degree, and is the current president of the Ottawa Civil War Round Table. He is the author of a local history book, At Your Target In Front, Fire!, The Story of Connaught Range.

Please join us for what promises to be a very unique and interesting program and welcome our guest from our great neighbor.

Last Month’s Program

We are massively informed and entertained last month by Chicago Police Department detective Robert Girardi, noted Civil War author on the murder of Union General William “Bull” Nelson by Union General Jefferson C. Davis. Despite witnesses to the event, and the lack of proper prosecution by the U.S. Army, tied up with the invasion of Kentucky by the Confederate armies of Braxton Bragg and Edmund Kirby Smith, Davis not only got away with the murder, but was promoted to corps command for Sherman’s March to the Sea. Nelson could be arrogant but he backed that up with solid battle performance. The speculation of how Perryville might have been had he been commanding one of Don Carlos Buell’s corps was brought out in Girardi’s program. Besides being an interesting Civil War event, Girardi’s own professional experience as a homicide detective really added tremendously to the program and the study of the case. It was delivered with complete knowledge of the topic and with humor and style. This is one of the best programs the Nashville CWRT has had and we thank Rob, and his guest Paula Walker, president of the Civil War Roundtable of Chicago, the nation’s first CWRT. We were most happy to have them both.

FUTURE PROGRAMS:
July 14, 2014 (second Monday meeting) – Conrad Laplante, Ottawa, Canada CWRT – “Canada and the American Civil War”
August 2014 – Kent Wright, historian/author – Tennessee Valley CWRT – “Conflicted Friendships: John Bull, Uncle Sam and King Cotton; The British Influence Upon Union and Confederate Naval Strategies”
September 2014 – Jamie Gillum, historian/author – “Twenty Five Hours To Tragedy: The Spring Hill Affair, November 29th, 1864”
October 2014 – Ron Crabtree, Nashville CWRT – “The Third Man: Did John Wilkes Booth Escape Garrett’s Farm?”
November 2014 – Rob Cross, historian, Belle Meade Plantation – Topic TBA
December 2014 – Brian Allison , historian – “The USCT Troops in the Battle of Nashville”
January 2015 – Scott Sallee, author/historian – “The Civil War In Northeast Missouri and the Palmyra Massacre” (based on his recent book)
March 2015 – Mark Hoffman, historian/author – The 1st Michigan Engineers and Mechanics in Middle Tennessee” (from his book)

MEMBERS AND DUES– The membership has decided that every May will be our fiscal year. Please plan on taking care of your membership renewals at this meeting. The annual dues structure for the Nashville CWRT is as follows:

Single membership – $20
Family – $30
Military – Active duty and Veterans – $15
Military Family – Active duty and Veterans – $25
Student – $10
Senior (age 60 plus) – $15
Senior couple – $20

Your dues for the 2014-2015 fiscal year are now due. Please plan on paying them at this month’s meeting if you have not already. Your dues go to bringing in our speakers, donating to causes, etc. If you are current you will have four stars on your name badge.

When your dues are paid your name badge with four stars on it will be available at the following meeting. If your badge does not have three stars on it then you are not current. Our dues go to paying for speakers as well as donations for Civil War preservation causes especially those of a local nature. Please be sure to pay your dues so we can offer the best programs possible for you! We also utilize donated items for silent auctions each month to help add to the treasury. If you have something you would like to donate for these auctions, please bring them to the meetings. Books, art, or anything Civil War, works very well. Thanks very much to all of you who have made such donations!

CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

More Great News From Franklin, Tennessee on Battlefield Reclamation

The news from Franklin continues to be exciting for saving more and more of that battlefield. According to the recent Save the Franklin Battlefield newsletter, a new parcel just south of the Carter House, currently home to the well known flower shop and one other building, is being purchased for $2.8 Million for the 1.6 acres. Located literally right next to the Carter farm office, this would be a key addition to the site. Funding is planned from grants, donations and other sources. STFB has also secured a strip of land along Meadowland Drive, part of the new Loring’s Advance area by the Carnton Manor. When cleared, the land will be added to that new park land.

Finally, the moving of houses from Cleburne Avenue continues with yet more homes being moved to new locations. The land will be incorporated into the planned Battle of Franklin park that is planned. Restored earthworks, trails and interpretive markers, plus a reconstructed Carter Gin will enhance the visitor experience.

If you wish to contribute to these worth causes please visit the Save the Franklin Battlefield web site at – http://www.franklin-stfb.org

Newsletter Editor Still Needed for the Nashville CWRT Newsletter

Another short newsletter this month due to a lack of time on my hands to do anything longer. We desperately need a newsletter editor to take over these monthly duties; I simply do not have the time to do it. All that is need is the writing of the newsletter with the programs, Civil War news, etc. using the same format that has been used since we began as a CWRT. I will provide the template to use. Hopefully someone will step forward to handle this. Please let us know at the July meeting. – Greg Biggs

May Newsletter and Meeting Notice

May 19th, 2014 – Our 62nd Meeting!! We continue our sixth year!

The next meeting of the Nashville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Monday, May 19th, 2014, in the visitor’s center of Ft. Negley Park, a unit of Metro Parks, Nashville, TN. This is located off I-65 just south of downtown between 4th Avenue South and 8th Avenue South on Edgehill Avenue/Chestnut Avenue. Take Exit 81, Wedgewood Avenue, off I-65 and follow the signs to the Science Museum. The meeting begins at 7:00 PM and is always open to the public. Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

OUR SPEAKER AND TOPIC – A Landscape Transformed: Fortifications of Middle Tennessee in the American Civil War

In a desperate attempt to take and hold the Tennessee and Cumberland River valleys, armies blue and gray dug deep into it, creating chains of fortifications across the landscape. Looking back, these bastions have been overshadowed by the battles and skirmishes that raged around them. Thomas Flagel looks at one structure in particular, Fort Granger in Franklin, Tennessee, and finds that, compared to the deadly 1864 Battle of Franklin, it was the lifespan of the fort that ultimately caused more destruction to humans, animals, and the environment.

Thomas Flagel is an assistant professor of American History at Columbia State Community College in Tennessee. He holds degrees from: Loras College (B.A., History); Kansas State University (M.A., European History); Creighton University (M.A., International Relations); and has studied at the University of Vienna. He is currently a doctoral student at Middle Tennessee State University (Public History).

Flagel serves on the Battle of Franklin Trust board of directors, Carter House board of directors, the Franklin Battlefield Preservation Commission, Franklin’s Charge board of directors, and works with many other preservation groups, including the Civil War Trust.

He is also the writer and narrator of “Sesquicentennial Stories” on WAKM Radio, a series that was nominated for the Peabody Award in 2011. Flagel currently resides in Franklin, Tennessee.

FUTURE PROGRAMS:
June 2014 – Robert Girardi, historian/author, Chicago Police Detective – “The Murder of Union General William “Bull” Nelson”
July 14, 2014 (second Monday meeting) – Conrad Laplante, Ottawa, Canada CWRT – “Canada and the American Civil War”
August 2014 – Kent Wright, historian/author – Tennessee Valley CWRT – “Conflicted Friendships: John Bull, Uncle Sam and King Cotton; The British Influence Upon Union and Confederate Naval Strategies”
September 2014 – Jamie Gillum
October 2014 – Ron Crabtree, Nashville CWRT – “The Third Man: Did John Wilkes Booth Escape Garrett’s Farm?”
December 2014 – TBA
November 2014 – Rob Cross, historian, Belle Meade Plantation – “The Spring Hill Affair”
January 2015 – Scott Sallee, author/historian – “The Civil War In Northeast Missouri and the Palmyra Massacre” (based on his recent book)
March 2015 – Mark Hoffman, historian/author – The 1st Michigan Engineers and Mechanics in Middle Tennessee” (from his book)

Very short newsletter this month – my apologies!. Our editor Ron Crabtree has been ill (get well soon!) and I have had way too much on m y plate this week to do a full one.

Do not miss this month’s program by one of the most gifted speakers in Tennessee! – Greg Biggs