Our September Meeting Info

Our speaker this month is Ed Kennedy of Huntsville, AL.  His topic is – “Horses In The War Between The States”
When the War Between the States began, the armies on both sides depended upon horses and mules almost exclusively to move artillery, supply wagons, and cavalry in the field. The US Army developed systems to obtain horses in large quantities but the Confederate military depended much more on individual soldiers to do so.  The result was the huge mobilization of equines into military service.  Find out the hows and whys in “Horses in the War Between the States”.

Lt. Colonel (Retired) Ed Kennedy is an Army “brat” whose family is from Mississippi and South Carolina.  He is the descendant of Confederate soldiers from South Carolina, Mississippi, and Alabama.  He grew up interested in the military history of his family whose members have served in every conflict beginning in the Revolutionary War. Two of his sons have served in the military in the Persian Gulf (Navy) and in Iraq (Army).

See you Tuesday, September 17th at the Fort Negley Visitors Center at 7 PM for our monthly meeting.

IMPORTANT NOTE – Some of you have spam blockers or servers that prevents the receipt of this newsletter by email.  Please make the needed changes so that you can continue to get the monthly newsletter from this email address.  Thanks very much.

May is also our fiscal year so dues are due at this meeting.  The dues fee schedule can be found in the newsletter.  If you did not pay dues yet please plan on paying your annual dues at this meeting.  If you have a name badge then you are current with your dues; if you do not then you are not dues current.  Our dues money goes to fund our excellent speakers and allows us to donate to preservation causes. Without the dues money we cannot do either so please pay your dues!

August Meeting Info!

August 20th, 2019 – Our 123nd meeting!!  We continue our tenth year. 

 

The next meeting of the Nashville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Tuesday, August 20th, 2019, in the visitor’s center of Ft. Negley Park, a unit of Metro Parks, Nashville, TN.  This is located off I-65 just south of downtown between 4th Avenue South and 8th Avenue South on Edgehill Avenue/Chestnut Avenue.  Take Exit 81, Wedgewood Avenue, off I-65 and follow the signs to the Science Museum.

 

The meeting begins at 7:00 PM and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

 

Our Speaker and Topic  – “General George Gordon Meade: A Leadership Reappraisal”

 

George G. Meade has not been treated kindly by history.  Victorious at Gettysburg, the biggest battle of the Civil War, Meade was the longest-serving commander of the Army of the Potomac, leading his army through the brutal Overland Campaign and on to the ultimate capture of Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox. Serving alongside his new superior, Ulysses S. Grant, in the last year of the war, his role has always been overshadowed by the popular Grant.  This first full-length study of Meade’s entire two year tenure as commander of the Army of the Potomac seeks to bring him out from Grant’s shadow and into focus as one of the top three Union generals of the war.

 

John G. Selby digs deeply into the primary sources to find a general bestride a large army he could manage well and a treacherous political environment he neither fully understood nor cared to engage.  An able career officer appointed to lead the largest and most important Union army in the aftermath of the debacle at Chancellorsville, the very apolitical Meade soon found himself in a political hot seat that ultimately cost him his most precious possession, his reputation.

 

Meade’s time as commander began on a high note, the defensive victory at the Battle of Gettysburg.  But when he failed to fight Lee’s retreating army that July and into the fall of 1863, the political knives came out, and he spent the winter of 1863-1864 struggling to retain his job as the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War sought to have him dismissed.  Confined by strategic and operational parameters established by President Lincoln, Secretary of War Stanton, and General Halleck, Meade saw his army reduced in size and his operational mobility restricted. Meade offered to resign when Grant was appointed commander of all the Union armies in March 1864, but Grant told him to keep his job.  Together, they managed the Overland Campaign and the initial attacks on Petersburg and Richmond in 1864.  This study uncovers a much more active role for Meade in the Virginia campaigns of 1864 than hitherto acknowledged, finding Meade to have more responsibility than usually presented for both the accomplishments and failures of the fighting that year. The study closes with Meade’s role in the Appomattox Campaign, which is another moment of victory and vindication for Meade and his army which is often minimized to enhance the success of Philip Sheridan.

 

By basing his study on the Official Records of the War of the Rebellion, original Meade letters, and the letters, diaries, journals, and reminiscences of contemporaries, Selby shows that Meade was a much more active, thoughtful, and enterprising commander than usually assumed.  At the same time, this sensitive and reflective man accepted a position that was as much political as it was military, even though he knew that the political dimensions of the job might ultimately destroy his reputation, if not his livelihood. Meade predicted much of the criticism that surrounded him for the two years he led the army, but he stubbornly persisted in his job.    He paid a greater price than he anticipated for his leadership, and it is time to re-evaluate more positively his tenure as commander of the Army of the Potomac.

 

     John G. Selby is professor of history at Roanoke College and the former holder of the John R. Turbyfill Chair in History at the same. A Civil War scholar, Selby wrote Virginians at War:  The Civil War Experiences of Seven Young Confederates and co-edited a large collection of published papers, Civil War Talks:  Further Reminiscences of George S. Bernard and His Fellow Veterans.

 

Last Month’s meeting

 

We thank Michael Manning, retired Chief Ranger at Fort Donelson National Battlefield, for his illuminating program on the events at Baxter Springs, one of the most tragic events in “Bleeding Kansas” in the Civil War.  As the alternator on my van went out on my way down I sadly missed this program but did hear great things about it.  Hope everyone enjoyed it..

 

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

 

September 2019 – Ed Kennedy, historian/retired military – “Horses In The War Between The States”

October 2019 – Dr. David Gregg, pastor, historian – “John Bell Hood in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, 1864”

November 2019 – Dr. Tim Johnson, historian/author, Lipscomb University – “For Duty and Honor: Tennessee’s Mexican war Experience”

December 2019 – Donna Lucas, Gallatin, TN

January 2020 – John Cashon, historian/author – “Paducah, KY in the Civil War”

February 2020 – Dr. Thomas Flagel, author/historian – “The 1913 Gettysburg Reunion”

 

Some of our speakers are authors and bring books to sell at our meetings.  Please support them by buying their books.

 

MEMBERS AND DUESThe membership has decided that every May will be our fiscal year.  Please plan on taking care of your membership renewals at this meeting.  The annual dues structure for the Nashville CWRT is as follows:

 

Single membership – $20
Family – $30
Military – Active duty and Veterans – $15
Military Family – Active duty and Veterans – $25
Student – $10
Senior (age 60 plus) – $15
Senior couple – $20

 

Your dues for the 2019-2020 fiscal year will be due at this meeting if you have not paid as yet!  Please plan on paying them at that month’s meeting if you have not already. 

 

PLEASE PLAN ON PAYING YOUR DUES THIS MONTH SO WE CAN KEEP BRINGING IN GREAT SPEAKERS AND HELP SAVE CIVIL WAR SITES.

 

When your dues are paid you will be issued a new name badge with the fiscal year on it.  If you do not have a name badge then you are not current.

 

Our dues go to paying for speakers as well as donations for Civil War preservation causes especially those of a local nature.  Please be sure to pay your dues so we can offer the best programs possible for you!  We also utilize donated items for sales each month to help add to the treasury.  If you have something you would like to donate for these auctions, please bring them to the meetings.  Books, art, or anything Civil War, works very well.  Thanks very much to all of you who have made such donations!

 

CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

New Book Of Images by Noted Sherman Photographer George Barnard Now Available

100 Significant Civil War Photographs: Atlanta Campaign by Stephen Davis

The American Civil War was the first war in which both sides widely used entrenchments, repeating rifles, ironclad warships, and telegraphed communications. It was also the first American war to be extensively photographed. Mathew Brady, Alexander Gardner, and Timothy O’Sullivan are famous for having made iconic photographs in the Civil War’s eastern theater. George N. Barnard deserves to be ranked in this top tier for his photographic work in the war’s western theater.

 

100 Significant Civil War Photographs: Atlanta Campaign, by Stephen Davis, presents a riveting collection of Barnard’s camera work. Most of the photographs are from Barnard’s time in Atlanta, mid-September to mid-November 1864, during the Federal occupation of the city. Some were published by him in 1866, but many more have appeared in the countless pictorial histories of the Civil War.

 

No comprehensive collection of Barnard’s Atlanta photographs has been published. With this volume, Stephen Davis attempts to advance the scholarly literature of Barnardiana. Two of the photographs reproduced in this book are believed never to have been widely published.

 

About the author: Stephen Davis of Cumming, Ga., is the author of four books on the Atlanta Campaign. He has been studying George Barnard’s photographs for decades.

 

We will have Steve speak to us in 2020 on this great new book!

 

Confederate Colonel Edmund Rucker Finally Gets A Biography

 

Edmund Rucker has military and other ties to Tennessee before and during the Civil War.  Starting with assisting in construction of several forts along the Mississippi River and then taking part in their defense, Rucker soon transferred to the cavalry under Nathan Bedford Forrest.  He was crucial to the victory at Brice’s Crossroads in June 1864.  Rucker was wounded and captured on the Granny White Pike in December 1864 in a rear guard action after the Confederate Army of Tennessee was defeated on the second day of the Battle of Nashville.

 

After the war, he joined with Forrest in some railroad ventures and then became an executive in the Sloss Iron and Steel company in the new city of Birmingham, Alabama, which helped spur the massive growth of the iron and steel industry in that state.  Fort Rucker, in Alabama, where U.S. Army personnel go today to become helicopter pilots, is named for him.

 

The book is entitled:  The Meanest and ‘Damnest’ Job: Being the Civil War Exploits and Civilian Accomplishments of Colonel Edmund Winchester Rucker During and After the War

 

Written by author/historian Michael Rucker of Peoria, Illinois, he married into the Rucker family.  We will have him down to speak to us in 2020.

American Battlefield Trust Raising Funds to Buy Land to Expand Stones River National Battlefield

Our member Howard Mann sent me this important note from the American Battlefield Trust and it indeed warrants inclusion in our newsletter as this will help expand a battlefield in Tennessee that badly needs to add more land to its holdings.  Stones River National Battlefield only owns a little over 20 per cent of the land out of the total battlefield footprint so this chance is terrific – and the price is right!  Also – a big THANK YOU to O’Reilly Auto Parts who decided to sell this important land rather than build their new warehouse on it which would have encroached on the view shed of the battlefield.  This site is along the Nashville Pike.  Well done!  As follows:

Have you ever found something that you thought you had lost forever? Perhaps a photograph, a letter, a piece of jewelry, or something else of great value to you?

If so, then you know exactly how I feel at this moment about the 42-acre tract we have a chance to preserve on the Stones River Battlefield (a.k.a. Murfreesboro) in Tennessee. The parcel is in the core of the fighting and, if saved, would help to connect two widely separated wings of the battlefield that are already protected by the National Park Service. On this land, the soldiers closed out a bloody 1862 and entered the new year with three days of fighting and nearly 25,000 casualties. The Union’s strategic victory at Stones River set the stage for campaigns into the heart of the Confederacy, while providing a much-needed northern morale boost.

We’ve had our eye on this particular tract for years, but when a private company purchased it for development, we thought all hope was lost.

Fortunately, we were wrong. The company that bought the tract, O’Reilly Auto Parts, appreciates the unique history of the property and has generously agreed to sell it to the Trust for preservation.

The purchase price is $4.0 million, but thanks to a state matching grant program created by the hard work of preservationists in Tennessee, together with federal funding, nearly the entire cost is covered. In fact, the Trust needs to raise just $170,000 of the total cost to secure this tract. (That’s a $33.94 -to-$1 match of your donation dollar!)

Please take a moment today to visit our website and read more about the history of this land, then give what you can to secure this precious American history for future generations.

Thank you for your generous dedication,
James Lighthizer
President
American Battlefield Trust

P.S. Please don’t let this incredible opportunity pass us by! We may never again be in a position to preserve such a significant tract of this crucial Civil War battlefield. I implore you to make the most of the $33.94 -to-$1 match by donating to save 42 acres at Stones River today.

https://www.battlefields.org/give/save-battlefields/save-42-acres-stones-river-battlefield?utm_campaign=062519&utm_medium=ask&utm_source=email

The yellow coded tract below is the land that can be saved with your and our donations!

BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS!!!!  A Large Selection of New Books Still Available at the Nashville CWRT This Month!

Danny Gilkey is a retired history professor at Austin Peay State University in Clarksville and he recently donated hundreds of books for the Nashville and Clarksville CWRTs to sell to members and raise funds for speakers for each CWRT.  Thanks to his great generosity these will be available for sale at this month’s meeting!  So come prepared to shop and add some great stuff to your library all while benefitting your CWRT!   Help give these fine books a new home!  Besides Civil War titles, there will also be books on these subjects: colonial and Revolutionary War books, slavery, Reconstruction, later 19th Century wars, World War 1, World War 2, Korea, Vietnam and Cold War topics.  Danny also made a most generous donation of some reference books to the Fort Negley library which is open to the public!

We appreciate those of you who bought from this great book selection last month!  The CWRT needs funds to keep getting in speakers and the book sales go towards that so thank you!  The prices for these great books or 50 per cent off or more so some great deals here for your library!  Please keep buying and supporting your CWRT!

Third Annual Congress of Civil War Roundtables – St. Louis, Missouri – September 20-22, 2019

The Civil War Congress was formed to help save and promote struggling CWRTs as well as to help new CWRTs get up and running.  The main design is to have programs that help a CWRT grow and sustain itself.  This is done through the various seminars that members and officers from the nation’s CWRTs can attend.  Also included are tours of local historic sites.

This year’s event is to be held in St. Louis at the Missouri Civil War Museum at Jefferson Barracks just south of the city.  Jefferson Barracks was an important U.S. Army post prior to and during the Civil War and many of the war’s best known officers served there as younger officers including Jefferson Davis, U.S. Grant, Robert E. Lee and more.  The Missouri Civil War Museum is a must-see with the story of the state that had the third largest number of battles being well told.  Loads of artifacts are displayed that help to tell the tale.

Learn from CWRT experts how they are addressing the issues of member recruitment and retention, marketing, fundraising and governance, participate in breakout sessions to discuss topics you define and network with CWRT leaders from around the country.  Find out how you can work with one another for a sustainable CWRT experience.  Eight great speakers will share what they do as well as offer historical lectures.

There will also be opportunities to tour the fabulous Missouri Civil War Museum, hear first-hand from General Ulysses S. Grant, find out how the Missouri guerrilla war was conducted and partisans were hunted through a presentation by author James Erwin and tour the nearby Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery and the Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site (White Haven).

To register for the conference please go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2019-cwrt-congress-tickets-55844856469?aff=mcivte   The fee is $135 per person.

Lodging

 

Drury Inn & Suites St. Louis Southwest
5 Lambert Drury Place
St. Louis, MO 63088
Telephone: (636) 861-8300
www.druryhotels.com

USE OUR GROUP NUMBER: 2369307

 

Drury Hotels features the following:

 

Free Hot Breakfast – Start every day with make-your-own Belgian waffles, scrambled eggs, sausage, fresh fruit, oatmeal, biscuits and gravy, KELSO+BROS® coffee and more.  Free hot breakfast is served daily from 6–9:30 a.m. on weekdays and 7–10 a.m. on weekends

Free 5:30 Kickback®* – Join us from 5:30–7 p.m. every evening to enjoy free hot food and cold beverages at our 5:30 Kickback®.  We feature a rotating menu of hot food, beer, wine, mixed drinks and soft drinks.

 

Free Wi-Fi Throughout the Hotel – Get the score, check your social networks or email family members from anywhere in the hotel – for free!

 

Free Soft Drinks and Popcorn – Freshly popped popcorn and a refreshing beverage make a great snack!  Stop by the lobby for free soft drinks and popcorn every evening.

 

On-Site Facilities – Take advantage of the business center, fitness center or pool while you’re away from home.  Print your boarding pass, finish a presentation or check e-mail in our business centers.

 

Please make your reservations by Sunday, August 18, 2019 to receive your group rate.  Reservations made after this date will be subject to prevailing rate and availability.   Reservations may also be made by calling 1-800-325-0720 and refer to your group number 2369307.

July Meeting Information

Our speaker this month is Michael Manning of Clarksville, TN.   His topic is – “The Massacre at Baxter’s Springs”

Bleeding Kansas began in 1854 with the passing of the Kansas-Nebraska Act which allowed for the citizens of a territory to determine if they were to be a slave or free state.  This resulted in six years of warfare prior to the start of the Civil War and which lasted far into the Reconstruction period.

One of the worst tragedies occurred on October 6, 1863, when Gen. James Blunt and about 100 men were met near Baxter’s springs by the notorious William Quantrill and 450-650 quasi-Confederates masquerading as Union Troops.  As Blunt’s band was preparing a musical salute the enemy fired. The surprise attack prevented organized resistance, and though Blunt escaped nine-tenths of his men were killed. The raiders also attacked Lt. James Pond and 95 men encamped at the springs. This force was likewise caught off guard but resisted until the enemy retired. This battle or massacre was indicative of how bloody Kansas really was.

Our speaker this month has been with us before – our own Mike Manning.  Michael J. Manning retired in 2015 as Chief Ranger of Fort Donelson National Battlefield, Tennessee.  He served with the National Park Service for 26 years.  He holds a Master’s Degree in Military History from American Military University and a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma.  He’s also a graduate of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center.

See you Tuesday, July 18th at the Fort Negley Visitors Center at 7 PM for our monthly meeting.

IMPORTANT NOTE – Some of you have spam blockers or servers that prevents the receipt of this newsletter by email.  Please make the needed changes so that you can continue to get the monthly newsletter from this email address.  Thanks very much.

May is also our fiscal year so dues are due at this meeting.  The dues fee schedule can be found in the newsletter.  If you did not pay dues yet please plan on paying your annual dues at this meeting.  If you have a name badge then you are current with your dues; if you do not then you are not dues current.  Our dues money goes to fund our excellent speakers and allows us to donate to preservation causes. Without the dues money we cannot do either so please pay your dues.

June Meeting Info!

Our speaker this month is Brad Butkovich of Atlanta, GA.   His topic is –  “The Battle of Allatoona Pass”

Atlanta, Georgia, the industrial, food distribution and shipping center of the Confederacy, fell to the Union forces of William T. Sherman on September 2, 1864.  John Bell Hood’s Army of Tennessee fell back first to Lovejoy Station and then moved west to Palmetto, GA so as to be on the railroad from Alabama, part of his new base of supplies.  After reorganizing the army , losing some commanders (notable William J. Hardee) and feting Confederate President Jefferson Davis, Hood soon planned to move north hoping to draw Sherman out from Atlanta and defeat him badly enough to force him to withdraw from Georgia.  It was a forlorn hope at best, but in a campaign of maneuver, moving over many of the same battlegrounds that had been fought over on the way to Atlanta, Hood ruptured the railroad to Chattanooga that supplied Sherman in several places and set his sights on the Union garrison at Allatoona Pass, where warehouses bulged with food, something Hood would badly need as the campaign progressed.  He sent a single division to attack the Federals who were heavily entrenched on two hills above the pass and some of their units were armed with repeating rifles and were supported by artillery.  The attack was a defeat for Hood and it would help to exacerbate his food problems for the rest of the campaign.  Was it the last battle of the Atlanta Campaign or the first of Hood’s Tennessee campaign?  Come see this month at the Nashville Civil War Roundtable!
Brad Butkovich has a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Georgia Southern University. He has published several books on the American Civil War including studies on the Battle of Pickett’s Mill and Allatoona Pass. He has always had a keen interest in Civil War history, photography and cartography, all of which have come together in his current projects. He is currently working on a 3 volume release of Ezra Carman’s Antietam manuscript with a heavy emphasis on maps and visual content.  His books will be for sale at the meeting!

See you Tuesday, June 18th at the Fort Negley Visitors Center at 7 PM for our monthly meeting.

IMPORTANT NOTE – Some of you have spam blockers or servers that prevents the receipt of this newsletter by email.  Please make the needed changes so that you can continue to get the monthly newsletter from this email address.  Thanks very much.

May is also our fiscal year so dues are due at this meeting.  The dues fee schedule can be found in the newsletter.  If you did not pay dues yet please plan on paying your annual dues at this meeting.  If you have a name badge then you are current with your dues; if you do not then you are not dues current.  Our dues money goes to fund our excellent speakers and allows us to donate to preservation causes. Without the dues money we cannot do either so please pay your dues.

March Newsletter and Meeting Notice!

March 19th, 2019 – Our 118th meeting!!  We continue our tenth year. 

 

The next meeting of the Nashville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Tuesday, March 19th,  2019, in the visitor’s center of Ft. Negley Park, a unit of Metro Parks, Nashville, TN.  This is located off I-65 just south of downtown between 4th Avenue South and 8th Avenue South on Edgehill Avenue/Chestnut Avenue.  Take Exit 81, Wedgewood Avenue, off I-65 and follow the signs to the Science Museum.

 

The meeting begins at 7:00 PM and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

 

Our Speaker and Topic  – “In Memory of Self and Comrades: Thomas Colley and the 1st Virginia Cavalry”

 

Thomas W. Colley served in one of the most famous and active units in the Civil War; the 1st Virginia Cavalry.  The regiment fought in battles from First Manassas to the defenses of Petersburg.  Colley left his home in May 1861 as part of the Washington Mounted Rifles reporting to training camp in Richmond, Virginia.  Colley was wounded during the war in three different engagements; Waterloo Bridge in 1862, Kelly’s Ford in 1863 and lastly at Haw’s Shop in 1864.  The latter wound caused the end of his service for it involved the amputation of his left foot.

 

The program this month is based on his wartime recollections and service compiled into a new book by historian Michael K. Shaffer.  Mike has spoken to us before on the Civil War in Washington County, Virginia and we welcome him back for this new book and program.

 

Michael K. Shaffer is a Civil War historian, instructor, lecturer, author and newspaper columnist.  He is a member of the Society of Civil War Historians, Historians of the Civil War in the WesternTheater and Georgia Association of Historians.   Shaffer teaches course at Kennesaw State University’s College of Continuing and Professional Education and lectures to Civil War groups across the country.

 

He will have copies of his book for sale at the meeting.

 

 

Last Month’s meeting

 

As I was not able to make the meeting I cannot review Scott Sallee’s program.  We thank him for the presentation to us.

 

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

 

April 2019 – Shayne Davidson – “Seventeen Men; 25th USCT”

May 2019 – Dr. Peter Carmichael, author/historian/director of Gettysburg College Civil War Center – topic TBA

June 2019 – Brad Butkovich, historian/author – “The Battle of Allatoona Pass: The First Battle of Hood’s Tennessee Campaign”

July 2019 – Michael Manning, retired National Park Service Chief Ranger – “The Massacre at Baxter’s Springs”

August 2019 – Dr. John Selby – “General George Meade” (From his new book)

September 2019 – Dr. Tim Johnson, historian/author, Lipscomb University – “For Duty and Honor: Tennessee’s Mexican war Experience”

October 2019 – Dr. David Gregg, pastor, historian – “John Bell Hood in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, 1864”

 

Some of our speakers are authors and bring books to sell at our meetings.  Please support them by buying their books.

 

MEMBERS AND DUES – The membership has decided that every May will be our fiscal year.  Please plan on taking care of your membership renewals at this meeting.  The annual dues structure for the Nashville CWRT is as follows:

 

Single membership – $20
Family – $30
Military – Active duty and Veterans – $15
Military Family – Active duty and Veterans – $25
Student – $10
Senior (age 60 plus) – $15
Senior couple – $20

 

Your dues for the 2018-2019 fiscal year will be due at the May 2018 meeting – LAST MONTH!  Please plan on paying them at that month’s meeting if you have not already.  Your dues go to bringing in our speakers, donating to causes, etc. 

 

PLEASE PLAN ON PAYING YOUR DUES THIS MONTH SO WE CAN KEEP BRINGING IN GREAT SPEAKERS AND HELP SAVE CIVIL WAR SITES.

 

When your dues are paid you will be issued a new name badge with the fiscal year on it.  If you do not have a name badge then you are not current.

 

Our dues go to paying for speakers as well as donations for Civil War preservation causes especially those of a local nature.  Please be sure to pay your dues so we can offer the best programs possible for you!  We also utilize donated items for silent auctions each month to help add to the treasury.  If you have something you would like to donate for these auctions, please bring them to the meetings.  Books, art, or anything Civil War, works very well.  Thanks very much to all of you who have made such donations!

CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

 

Stones River and Franklin/Nashville Campaign Tour With the Civil War Roundtable of the District of Columbia of Washington, DC

 

Our friends of the Civil War Roundtable of the District of Columbia of Washington, DC., are coming to Middle Tennessee for a Civil War tour from April 5 through 7, 2019.

This tour explores the multi-year struggle to gain and maintain control of Middle Tennessee. Tennessee, particularly Middle Tennessee, like Virginia, was a battleground state. Tennessee saw battles within a year of seceding and the fighting continued to the end of the war. We visit two of the greatest of these conflicts at Stones River and at major sites of the Franklin-Nashville Campaign.

Our guide, Jim Lewis, leads us through the decisive engagements of the 1862 and 1864 fighting for the region. Jim has been a Park Ranger with the National Park Service since 1991. Since 1997, he has been at Stones River National Battlefield. He became its Chief of Interpretation & Cultural Resource Management in 2016. Jim has researched and presented dozens of interpretive programs at Stones River National Battlefield and across the country on a variety of Civil War topics. He has also produced numerous interpretive publications and exhibits for the National Park Service.  Jim is a terrific historian and guide.

Members of the Nashville CWRT do not have to pay the full ride since they are not coming from DC but there is a few for the bus.  For more details please email Susan Claffey of the DC CWRT and tell her you are with the Nashville CWRT.  She will be able to take care of your questions.  Her email is – susankclaffey@cwrtdc.org

Kennesaw State University in Georgia Holds New Civil War Seminar – March 23rd, 2019

The Railroad War: Transportation’s Critical Role in the Civil War

 The Center for the Study of the Civil War Era at Kennesaw State University will hold its 16th Annual Civil War Symposium on March 23, 2019 from 9 AM to 12 PM at the KSU Continuing Education Center in Kennesaw, GA.

 

This year’s theme is “The Railroad War: Transportation’s Critical Role in the Civil War” with presentations by Dr. Brian Wills, Director of Center for the Study of the Civil War Era; Dr. Gordon Jones, Senior Military Historian at the Atlanta History Center; and Thomas Parson, Historian and Author.

The Symposium is free and open to the public – NO RSVP NECESSARY

 

EVENT LOCATION:

KSU Center Rm. 400

3333 Busbee Drive, Kennesaw, GA 30144  (only four hours from Middle Tennessee)

For more information please email Sarah Rudick at – srudick@kennesaw.edu

The Final Books From The Late And Noted Author And Historian Kenneth Hafendorfer Available – Stocks Are Low

 

Many of you know of, have met or have read the numerous Civil War books by Kenneth Hafendorfer of Louisville, KY.  His specialty was the war in Kentucky and he wrote about Perryville (the first author to do so and he and updated that book), Mill Springs, Wildcat Mountain and the Confederate retreat from Kentucky in the Fall of 1862.  Sadly, he passed away a couple years ago but not before finishing his new two volume set on the war in Kentucky in 1862.  I have a set of these massive books and the detail is stunning as one would expect from his books.

 

His daughter Jennifer contacted me to let me know that only ten sets of this new book series remain out of the 108 he had published.  The set is $170 plus tax and shipping.

 

If you are interested please contact Jennifer at – jennifer.hafendorfer@gmail.com – and let her know that you are interested in the set.  You will not regret it and he will be missed.

 

 

New Book on the Battle of Johnsonville, TN Due This Fall

Many of you will recall when we had Clarksville native Jerry Wooten speak to us about the attack on the Union supply depot on the Tennessee River at Johnsonville in early November 1864.  Jerry was superintendent for that Tennessee State Park for a number of years before moving to Bicentennial Mall in Nashville.

Jerry has written a new book on the Battle of Johnsonville and it will be out this Fall thanks to Savas Beattie Publishers of California.  Be sure to put this one on your Christmas books list.  Well done Jerry!

 

 

 

January Meeting!

The next meeting of the Nashville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Tuesday, January 15th,  2019, in the visitor’s center of Ft. Negley Park, a unit of Metro Parks, Nashville, TN.  This is located off I-65 just south of downtown between 4th Avenue South and 8th Avenue South on Edgehill Avenue/Chestnut Avenue.  Take Exit 81, Wedgewood Avenue, off I-65 and follow the signs to the Science Museum.

 

The meeting begins at 7:00 PM and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

 

Our Speaker and Topic  –  “The Woman Behind the Man: Three Fascinating Confederate Couples – Mrs. John Gordon, Mrs. Sam Watkins and Betty Taylor”

 

What ties together a midnight wedding during the fall of Richmond or risking court-martial for a few hours with a sweetheart?  Fanny Gordon, was she the Confederates’ secret weapon?  This month’s program is a light-hearted look at Confederate couples General John B. Gordon and Fanny Gordon, Tennessee’s own Sam Watkins and ‘Jennie,’ and Confederate staff officer Walter Taylor and Bettie Saunders.  These men are well known to Civil War buffs but how much do we know of the ladies in their lives?

 

These fascinating ladies will be the topic of this month’s interesting and fun program that will also include a side excursion into the softer but infinitely complex side of General Robert E. Lee through his surprisingly flirtatious correspondence with young women.  Lee, while sometimes portrayed as a somewhat stoic man who often kept his emotions in check, was indeed quite the ladies man.  Loyal to his wife, of course, Lee was more than happy to receive the attention of the women of the South.

 

Our speaker this month is Donna Hartley Lucas holds a bachelors degree in Advertising from the University of Texas at Austin and a law degree from Nashville School of Law.  She is president of Historic Sumner, Inc. which publishes The Old Sumner Times-Record retro newspaper and is tour creator/presenter of The Gallatin Ghost Walk history/mystery tour. She has participated in cemetery tours and civilian re-enacting groups since 1995.  Hartley Lucas is a fifth generation native Texan and a member of the Albert Sidney Johnston Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy in Austin.

 

We hope you will join us for a fun and informative program this month.

 

Last Month’s meeting

 

We thank Susan Witsofsky, aka Ski for coming down and filling us in on the numerous happenings in Dover and Stewart County, Tennessee.  Not only were the big battles of Fort Henry and Fort Donelson fought there but two other attacks on Dover plus numerous skirmishes against Confederate cavalry raiders and guerrillas including the notorious Jack Hinson.  Marion Morrison, John Wayne’s grandfather, fought in Dover and Stewart County in the 83rd Illinois Infantry as did Virgil Earp, Wyatt’s older brother.  Stewart County was a vital cog in the Union supply line along the Cumberland River and as such remained a military target for the rest of the war.  Thanks Ski for letting us know about this history.

 

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

 

February 2019 – Scott Sallee, author/historian/Nashville CWRT

March 2019 – Michael Shaffer, author/historian, Marietta, GA

April 2019 – TBA

May 2019 – Dr. Peter Carmichael, author/historian/director of Gettysburg College Civil War Center – topic TBA

June 2019 – Brad Butkovich, historian/author – “The Battle of Allatoona Pass: The First Battle of Hood’s Tennessee Campaign”

October 2019 – Dr. David Gregg, pastor, historian – “John Bell Hood in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, 1864”

 

Some of our speakers are authors and bring books to sell at our meetings.  Please support them by buying their books.

 

MEMBERS AND DUES – The membership has decided that every May will be our fiscal year.  Please plan on taking care of your membership renewals at this meeting.  The annual dues structure for the Nashville CWRT is as follows:

 

Single membership – $20
Family – $30
Military – Active duty and Veterans – $15
Military Family – Active duty and Veterans – $25
Student – $10
Senior (age 60 plus) – $15
Senior couple – $20

 

Your dues for the 2018-2019 fiscal year will be due at the May 2018 meeting – LAST MONTH!  Please plan on paying them at that month’s meeting if you have not already.  Your dues go to bringing in our speakers, donating to causes, etc. 

 

PLEASE PLAN ON PAYING YOUR DUES THIS MONTH SO WE CAN KEEP BRINGING IN GREAT SPEAKERS AND HELP SAVE CIVIL WAR SITES.

 

When your dues are paid you will be issued a new name badge with the fiscal year on it.  If you do not have a name badge then you are not current.

 

Our dues go to paying for speakers as well as donations for Civil War preservation causes especially those of a local nature.  Please be sure to pay your dues so we can offer the best programs possible for you!  We also utilize donated items for silent auctions each month to help add to the treasury.  If you have something you would like to donate for these auctions, please bring them to the meetings.  Books, art, or anything Civil War, works very well.  Thanks very much to all of you who have made such donations!

 

 

December meeting notice and Newsletter!

December 18th, 2018 – Our 115th meeting!!  We continue our tenth year. 

 

The next meeting of the Nashville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Tuesday, December 18th, 2018, in the visitor’s center of Ft. Negley Park, a unit of Metro Parks, Nashville, TN.  This is located off I-65 just south of downtown between 4th Avenue South and 8th Avenue South on Edgehill Avenue/Chestnut Avenue.  Take Exit 81, Wedgewood Avenue, off I-65 and follow the signs to the Science Museum.

 

The meeting begins at 7:00 PM and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

 

Our Speaker and Topic  –  “Stewart County, Tennessee in the Civil War”

 

Those of us in Nashville and Davidson County, TN, having the much larger county population wise, often forget that one of the biggest Civil War battles in our area was northwest of us in Stewart County – the Forts Henry and Donelson Campaign.  What happened there affected Middle Tennessee for the rest of the war and directly led to the capture of Nashville by the Federals in February 1862.

 

But how much else do we know of Stewart County in the Civil War?  What units were raised there?  What other events took place there in terms of battles, raids, guerrilla activity and more?  How were the locals affected by the war literally outside of their front doors?  How did the small town of Dover (some 400 people at the time) deal with three battles fought within its limits in 1862?

 

Answering these and other questions is our own “Ski,” Susan Witzofsky, a well known expert on many things Stewart County historically.  She will inform us of the hardships of the people from war time and into Reconstruction; the loss of boats on the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers and so much more.

 

Local historian Susan “Ski” Witzofsky is a graduate of APSU. She retired from TVA Land between the Lakes National Recreation Area after more than twenty years. During her tenure she managed campgrounds.  She is also a noted authority on Land between the Lakes National Recreation Area including Stewart County Tn. and Trigg and Lyon Counties in Ky.

 

Ski has served on Boards for local organizations including Friends of Fort Donelson,

Friends of National Wildlife Refuge and Cross Creek Refuge, Stewart County Historial Society.

Ski is an active participant in these and other organizations.  Ski also conducts historical tours, local school programs and, UDC, SCV, programs.  In addition to her interest in all historical aspects of the Civil War, LBL and Stewart County History she enjoys fishing, hunting, and picking wild mushrooms. Other interest include researching local history, families, cemeteries, Iron Industry, Ft Donelson National Cemetery, and local Civil war Units.  Ski is always interested speaking and sharing information.

 

We hope you will join us for a fun and informative program this month.

 

Last Month’s meeting

 

In October, Gerald Augustus taught us with the important Battle of Campbell Station (now Farragut, TN), the first battle of the Knoxville Campaign of November, 1863.  Confederate General James Longstreet’s Corps, with attached units from Bragg’s Army of Tennessee, was in a footrace with Union General Ambrose Burnside to take or hold Knoxville which sat astride the important road and railroad network connecting Tennessee with Virginia.  Sadly, while most of the period battlefield is now gone, the program used current and old images of it to show us all how the running fight took place.  This is a fine program about one of the lesser known fights of the war and we were glad to have Gerald with us.

 

The November speaker has been rescheduled for October 2019.

 

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

 

January 2019 – Donna Lucas, historian – “The Woman Behind the Man: Three Fascinating Confederate Couples – Mrs. John Gordon, Mrs. Sam Watkins and Betty Taylor”

February 2019 – Scott Sallee, author/historian/Nashville CWRT

March 2019 – Michael Shaffer, author/historian

May 2019 – Dr. Peter Carmichael, author/historian/director of Gettysburg College Civil War Center – topic TBA

June 2019 – Brad Butkovich, historian/author – “The Battle of Allatoona Pass: The First Battle of Hood’s Tennessee Campaign”

October 2019 – Dr. David Gregg, pastor, historian – “John Bell Hood in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, 1864”

 

Some of our speakers are authors and bring books to sell at our meetings.  Please support them by buying their books.

 

MEMBERS AND DUES – The membership has decided that every May will be our fiscal year.  Please plan on taking care of your membership renewals at this meeting.  The annual dues structure for the Nashville CWRT is as follows:

 

Single membership – $20
Family – $30
Military – Active duty and Veterans – $15
Military Family – Active duty and Veterans – $25
Student – $10
Senior (age 60 plus) – $15
Senior couple – $20

Your dues for the 2018-2019 fiscal year will be due at the May 2018 meeting – LAST MONTH!  Please plan on paying them at that month’s meeting if you have not already.  Your dues go to bringing in our speakers, donating to causes, etc. 

 

PLEASE PLAN ON PAYING YOUR DUES THIS MONTH SO WE CAN KEEP BRINGING IN GREAT SPEAKERS AND HELP SAVE CIVIL WAR SITES.

 

When your dues are paid you will be issued a new name badge with the fiscal year on it.  If you do not have a name badge then you are not current.

 

Our dues go to paying for speakers as well as donations for Civil War preservation causes especially those of a local nature.  Please be sure to pay your dues so we can offer the best programs possible for you!  We also utilize donated items for silent auctions each month to help add to the treasury.  If you have something you would like to donate for these auctions, please bring them to the meetings.  Books, art, or anything Civil War, works very well.  Thanks very much to all of you who have made such donations!

 

CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

Some Great Events Coming Up At Fort Negley in Nashville This Month

Fort Negley is having some wonderful events this month starting on Saturday, December 15th, members of the 13th USCT will be setting up at Fort Negley along with General George Thomas and President Abraham Lincoln to help commemorate the 154th Anniversary of the Battle of Nashville.

 

The program also includes these events:

 

– 10:00 am The Battle For Nashville (film), 58 minutes
– 12:00 pm Near Death Experience: Civil War Nashville and the Question of Recovery presented by Dr. Thomas Flagel (this is a terrific program)
– 1:30 pm 8th Minnesota Infantry presented by John Allyn

 

And on Tuesday, December 18th from noon to 1 PM, historian Dr. Tim Johnson, a noted expert on the Mexican-American War, is giving a program based on his new book on Tennessee’s Mexican War experience.  Using letters, documents and more, Dr. Johnson has discovered very interesting facts on how they felt about their mission in Mexico.  His new book will also be on sale at Fort Negley during their Lunch and Learn series for December.  Be sure to bring your lunch and be ready for a fine program.

 

Of course the Nashville CWRT meets later that night at 7 PM.

 

Please support your local Civil War sites and their programs!

 

Battle of Nashville Preservation Society Holds Great Tennessee Campaign Seminar

 

On Sunday, December 2nd, the Battle of Nashville Preservation Society held a wonderful seminar with four speakers on various aspects of the Tennessee Campaign.  The event was very well attended with people from across Middle Tennessee and several from Alabama.

 

Let’s hope that this is the first of other planned similar events by BONPS.  Very well done event folks and thanks for your hard work!

 

Program Chair Greg Biggs Will Not Be At the December Meeting

 

Nope – Tennessee is too warm this time of year so I will be speaking to the Twin Cities CWRT in Minneapolis that evening where it will be assuredly colder and thus cannot make the December Nashville CWRT this month.  The speaker, Ski, is a good friend and really knows her stuff about Stewart County so you will enjoy her.  I wish you all a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year and will see everyone in January, 2019.